Research evidence and relevant hrm , HR Management

Topic 1:

Organizations are better off if they spend on the recruitment and selection of employees beyond their current level of job duties rather than spending a great deal of money on training.

Topic 2:

An employee desires a better lifestyle in terms of work-life balance but dose not want to give up a challenging job, high salary and performance bonuses. Is it possible to "have it all"?

You should draw on real-life work situations, research evidence and relevant HRM literature beyond your text book to substantiate and illuminate your viewpoints

 

Posted Date: 2/21/2013 6:11:23 AM | Location : United States







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