production possibilities, Macroeconomics

you and your neighbor (n) consume without trading. suppose you are initially consuming 7 bananas and 3 coconuts and your neighbor is initially consuming 6 bananas and8 coconuts. You give your neighbor half of your production for half of what he produces. if you trade with your neighbor, then you will have ? additional coconuts after the trade and ? additional bananas? at the same time, your neighbor will be able to comsume?
Posted Date: 9/23/2012 9:49:02 PM | Location : United States







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