Process configurations - products, Operation Management

Process configurations - products

The categorisation of production systems according to volume of output was discussed: project, job shop, batch and continuous. The Hayes and Wheelwright product - process matrix (1984) was then presented, showing the 'natural' positions of each of the configurations with regard to volume, variety and flexibility. When undertaking process design it is desirable to have some indication, perhaps by forecasts, of the likely level of demand for the product and the corresponding volume of process output to be generated.

With the knowledge of the approximate position along the job shop/batch/continuous spectrum, it is possible to narrow the range of process configurations to be devised and compared. If the demand is expected to be low, then large-batch or continuous systems need not be considered; their inflexibility would be unsuitable for the production of a variety of low-volume products, and their potential for low unit costs would be unattainable. Likewise, if the demand is expected to be high, job shop/small-batch systems would not be considered; their high unit costs would render the product uncompetitive, and their flexibility would be superfluous.

However, it is worth mentioning in passing that, under the heading of mass customisation, equipment suppliers are putting great efforts into the development of advanced computer-integrated manufacturing (CIM) systems which will provide the low unit costs of continuous systems and some of the flexibility of job shops. Consideration should also be given to the likely product life cycle curve and the expected durations of the start-up and rapid growth phases; for a product which, at maturity, reaches high volume, it may be necessary to change the type of production more than once during the product's life. Along with the change in volume and process flow type, as the product matures it is likely that the order winning criteria will also change, necessitating progressive amendment of the relevant measures of operational performance.

Posted Date: 3/16/2013 2:14:42 AM | Location : United States







Related Discussions:- Process configurations - products, Assignment Help, Ask Question on Process configurations - products, Get Answer, Expert's Help, Process configurations - products Discussions

Write discussion on Process configurations - products
Your posts are moderated
Related Questions
Natural extrinsic reward include all the following except/1.compliment/2.special Jon/3.asking advice/4.recognition/5. Merit pay increase/ which of these-answer is correct

1. What are the three requirements which must simultaneously be met when designing jobs?   Answer: Technical, economic and behavioural feasibility.

Marketers traditionally classify products on the basis of characteristics: durability, tangibility, and use (consumer or industrial). Discuss the appropriate marketing-mix strategy

Slighty Used Goods has Cash of $2,150 inventory of $28,470, fixed assets of $9,860, accounts payable of $11,900, and account receivable of $4,660. What is the cash ratio?

A large supplier of electronic components has decided to control the inventory of a certain item by a periodic review, order up to R policy. The mean demand rate for this item is 5

Cattell's 16PF test is normally associated with Employee selection

Answer the following questions on the Topic of The History of the American Corporation 1-Describe what is the rule of law and its importance on a successful capitalistic society

Generationally-speaking", our business environment is more diverse than ever before with both young and older working side-by-side. Each age group espouses characteristics that len

Conduct an analysis of American Apparel. Assess American Apparel's vertical integration, global strategy, and diversification. Compare American Apparel's approach to Google's