Perfect data, Game Theory

 

A sequential game is one among one in all if just one player moves at a time and if every player is aware of each action of the players that moved before him at every purpose. Technically, each data set contains precisely one node. Intuitively, if it's my flip to maneuver, I invariably grasp what each different player has done up to currently. All different games are games of imperfect data.

 

Posted Date: 7/21/2012 4:42:41 AM | Location : United States







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