Per-experiment error rate, Advanced Statistics

Per-experiment error rate is the possibility of the incorrectly rejecting at least one null hypothesis or assumption in the experiment including one or more tests or comparisons, when the corresponding null hypothesis is true in each and every case.

Posted Date: 7/31/2012 1:35:59 AM | Location : United States

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