Pathophysiology and assessment of iron deficiency anaemia, Biology

Pathophysiology 

Insufficient  amount of iron present in the body leads  to reduction in serum transferrin (Serum betaglobulin, which binds and transports iron) saturation.  This results  in decreased production of hemoglobin.  As  the haemoglobin production lessens, new red cells that are formed become smaller (Microcytic)  less well filled with hemoglobin  and pale (Hypochromic). Iron deficiency results  in reduced haemoglobin levels, diminished red cell formation and reduced oxygen carrying capacity of the blood, resulting  in anaemia. 

Assessment 

Your responsibility  as  a nurse is to  identify,  the  symptoms  like  irritability,  loss of appetite mainly  for solid foods, pica, pallor, lethargy, listlessness and constipation. The child may appear normal but his potential  for growth and development and intellectual performance is effected. 

The infant with iron deficiency anaemia is many a times over weight because of excessive intake  of milk and is called milk baby. Some children may be underweight because of anorexia. 

Diagnostic evaluation includes, thorough dietary history, blood examination which shows fall in RBC count, haemoglobin level (below 11 gm/dl), a lowered packed cell volume (PCV) mean corpuscular volume (MCV) mean cotpusular haemoglobin concentration (MCHC). Peripheral blood smear shows hypochromic, microcytic cells, serum ferritin concentration values below 10 mg/dl and serum iron levels are below 30 mg/dl and total iron binding capacity is elevated to 350 mg/dl. Stool is examined for ova, cysts and occult blood.

Posted Date: 10/26/2012 9:10:33 AM | Location : United States







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