Ordinal payoffs, Game Theory

 

Ordinal payoffs are numbers representing the outcomes of a game where the worth of the numbers isn't vital, however solely the ordering of numbers. for instance, when solving for a Nash equilibrium in pure methods, one is just involved with whether or not one payoff is larger than another - the degree of the distinction isn't vital. Thus, we are able to assign values like "1" for the worst outcome, "2" for following best, and so on. Thus, ordinal payoffs merely rank all of the outcomes. For mixed strategy calculations, cardinal payoffs should use.

 

Posted Date: 7/21/2012 4:38:31 AM | Location : United States







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