Open market operations, Managerial Economics

Open Market Operations

The Central Bank holds government securities.  It can sell some of these, or buy more, on the open market, buying or selling through a stock exchange or money market.  When the bank sells securities to be bought by members of the public, the buyers will pay by writing cheques on their accounts with commercial banks.  This means a cash drain for these banks to the central bank, represented by  a fall in the item "bankers" deposits' at the central bank, which forms part of the commercial banks' reserve assets.  Since the banks maintain a fixed liquidity (or cash) ratio, the loss of these reserves will bring about multiple contraction of bank loans and deposits.

By going into the market as a buyer of securities, the central bank can reverse the process, increasing the liquidity of commercial banks, causing them to expand bank credit, always assuming a ready supply of credit-worthy borrowers.

Conversely, if the central bank wanted to pursue an expansionary monetary policy by making more credit available to the public, it would buy bonds from the public.  It would pay sellers by cheques drawn on itself, the sellers would then deposit these with commercial banks, who would deposit them again with the central bank.  This increase in cash and reserve assets would permit them to carry out a multiple expansion of bank deposits, increasing advances and the money supply together.

Posted Date: 11/29/2012 4:49:44 AM | Location : United States







Related Discussions:- Open market operations, Assignment Help, Ask Question on Open market operations, Get Answer, Expert's Help, Open market operations Discussions

Write discussion on Open market operations
Your posts are moderated
Related Questions
Describe about the Theory of profit Every industrial and business enterprise aims at maximising profit. Profit is the difference between total economic cost and totalrevenue. P

is the sales maximization applicable

show how scarcity and opportunity cost are useful in decisionmaking

Methods which rely on quantitative data: Rule-based forecasting Data mining Quantitative analogies Discrete event simulation Neural networks Extrapo

INDIRECT TAXES These are imposed on an individual mostly producers or traders but they can be passed on to be borne by others usually the final consumers.  They can also be de

Inelastic Supply Supply is said to be price inelastic if changes in price bring about changes in quantity supplied in less proportion.  Thus, when price increases quantity sup

Peanut butter monopolist Calvé supplies peanut butter to Albert Heijn in an isolated village. The supermarket is a monopolist in the village. Demand for peanut butter is given by:


Q. What is the Nature of Commodity ? The nature of a commodity as well has an effect on the price elasticity of its demand. Commodities can be characterised ascomforts, luxurie