Ohms law, Electrical Engineering

 

Ohms Law

The voltage developed across a resistor is proportional to the current passing through it .The constant of proportionality is defined as the resistance of the component.Hence

V = I . R

 

 

 

 

Posted Date: 8/20/2012 11:48:10 PM | Location : United States







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