Objectives of government in economy, Managerial Economics

OBJECTIVES OF GOVERNMENT

Government policies are required in market economies to achieve certain goals.  There are broadly two types of government policies viz;

  1. Microeconomic policy objectives
  2. And macroeconomic policy objectives.
Posted Date: 11/30/2012 2:58:38 AM | Location : United States







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