Non-cooperative game , Game Theory

 

A non-cooperative game is one during which players are unable to form enforceable contracts outside of these specifically modeled within the game. Hence, it's not outlined as games during which players don't cooperate, however as games during which any cooperation should be self-enforcing. Games during which players will enforce contracts through outside parties are termed cooperative games.

 

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