Neo-classical view, Managerial Economics

The neo-classical view

The neo-classical view is that market forces are the best directors of the economy.  Positive attempts by the government it is argued inevitably make things worse.  The correct posture for fiscal policy, therefore, is simply to minimize the role of government, thus leaving the largest proportion of the economy possible to be run by the market forces.

Posted Date: 11/30/2012 4:36:03 AM | Location : United States







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