NAsh equilibrium, Game Theory

Consider a game in which player 1 chooses rows, player 2 chooses columns and player 3 chooses matrices. Only Player 3''s payoffs are given below. Show that D is not a best response for player 3 against any combination of (mixed) strategies of players 1 and 2. However, prove that D is not dominated by any (mixed) strategies of player 3.

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Posted Date: 11/9/2013 9:05:24 PM | Location : United Kingdom







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