Multivariate analysis of variance, Applied Statistics

Multivariate analysis of variance (MANOVA) is a technique to assess group differences across multiple metric dependent variables simultaneously, based on a set of categorical (non-metric) variables acting as independent variables. It provides information on the nature and predictiv . power of the independent measures, as well as the relat~onsliips and differences seen in the depend~nt measures. MANOVA involves a structured method to specity the comparisons of group differences for ther dependent variables and still maintain statistical efficiency.

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