Morphological changes - floral induction, Biology

Morphological Changes - Floral Induction

Some of the morphological changes that accompany floral induction are:

  • Change in the shape of meristem,
  • Increase in the rate of growth of appendages like plastochromes,
  • Precocious initiation of axillary meristems,
  • Increased growth of internodes.

The transformation of the vegetative apex into reproductive apex is manifested in different ways in different plants. These examples such as sunflower, chrysanthemum etc. in which the shoot apex itself transforms into an inflorescence bearing florets. There is a tremendous increase in the radial growth (as opposed to vertical growth) occasionally reaching an area of 1000 fold This flowering and fruiting generally result in the cessation of growth of the mother plant, senescence and death. There are also instances in which the axillary buds give rise to inflorescences or single flowers. This you find in perennial plants with seasonal flowering and fruiting. Of course we have annuals like pea Pisum or Sarason (Brassica) in which a large number of axillary buds metamorphose into reproductive apices. In pea the vegetative apex ends up in a leaf, but in all cases flowering and fruiting affect vegetative growth negatively. Let us keep in mind that floral induction is a genetically programmed process. Wheat flowers within four months. Even if exposed to conducive photoperiodic conditions-immature plant cannot flower. A mango tree does not flower in just two years of planting. Agave tree can flower in 7-10 years.

Posted Date: 1/24/2013 1:21:11 AM | Location : United States







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