Method of moments, Advanced Statistics

Method of moments is the procedure for estimating the parameters in a model by equating sample moments to the population values. A famous early instance of the use of the procedure is in Karl Pearson's description of estimating five parameters in the finite mixture distribution with two univariate normal components. Little taken in use in modern statistics since the estimates are known to be less efficient than those given by the alternative procedures such as the maximum likelihood estimation. 

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