Logarithm equations, Algebra

Now we will discuss as solving logarithmic equations, or equations along with logarithms in them.  We will be looking at two particular types of equations here. In specific we will look at equations wherein every term is a logarithm & we also look at equations wherein all but one term in the equation is a logarithm & the term without the logarithm will be a constant.  Also, we will be supposing that the logarithms in each of the equation will have the similar base. If there is more than one base in the logarithms into the equation the solution procedure becomes much more difficult.

Before we get into the solution procedure we will have to remember that we can just plug +ve numbers into a logarithm.  

Now, let's begin by looking at equations wherein each term is a logarithm and all the bases on the logarithms are the similar.  In this case we will employ the fact that,

                         If  logb  x = logb  y then x = y

 In other terms, if we've got two logs in the problem, one on either side of an equal sign & both with a coefficient of one, after that we can just drop the logarithms.

Posted Date: 4/8/2013 3:28:29 AM | Location : United States







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