Local and recognizable languages, Theory of Computation

We developed the idea of FSA by generalizing LTk transition graphs. Not surprisingly, then, every LTk transition graph is also the transition graph of a FSA (in fact a DFA)-the one in which the state set Q is just the set of nodes of the LTk transition graph. We get, as an immediate consequence, that every LT language (and, hence, every SL language and every ?nite language) is recognizable. In generalizing to arbitrary state sets, though, we have actually increased the power of our automata.

Posted Date: 3/21/2013 3:36:25 AM | Location : United States







Related Discussions:- Local and recognizable languages, Assignment Help, Ask Question on Local and recognizable languages, Get Answer, Expert's Help, Local and recognizable languages Discussions

Write discussion on Local and recognizable languages
Your posts are moderated
Related Questions
how many pendulum swings will it take to walk across the classroom?

A finite, nonempty ordered set will be called an alphabet if its elements are symbols, or characters. A finite sequence of symbols from a given alphabet will be called a string ove


The Last Stop Boutique is having a five-day sale. Each day, starting on Monday, the price will drop 10% of the previous day’s price. For example, if the original price of a product

We represented SLk automata as Myhill graphs, directed graphs in which the nodes were labeled with (k-1)-factors of alphabet symbols (along with a node labeled ‘?' and one labeled

Another way of interpreting a strictly local automaton is as a generator: a mechanism for building strings which is restricted to building all and only the automaton as an inexh

If the first three words are the boys down,what are the last three words??

DEGENERATE OF THE INITIAL SOLUTION

What is the Best way to write algorithm and construct flow chart? What is Computer? How to construct web page and Designe it?

1. An integer is said to be a “continuous factored” if it can be expresses as a product of two or more continuous integers greater than 1. Example of continuous factored integers