Lithium fluoride is less soluble in water, Chemistry

Lithium Fluoride is less soluble in water. But in some ways consider that when Lithium Fluoride dissolve in water, an alkaline solution will find. can u please explain that why this is taken in to consideration even in the occation of lithium fluoride's solubility is too much less?

Ans) Lithium fluoride is an inorganic compound with the formula LiF. It is the lithium salt of hydrofluoric acid. This white solid is a simple ionic compound. Its structure is analogous to that of sodium chloride, but it is much less soluble in water.Due to the higher electronegativity of lithium, some of its compounds have a more covalent character. For example, lithium iodide (LiI) will dissolve in organic solvents, a property of most covalent compounds.Lithium fluoride (LiF) is the only alkali halide that is not soluble in water, and lithium hydroxide (LiOH) is the only alkali metal hydroxide that is not deliquescent.

Posted Date: 3/11/2013 3:13:28 AM | Location : United States







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