Library binding - publisher casings and paperbacks, Other Management

Library Binding:

Binding should be appropriate to the type of material and to the expected use. Early binding for libraries stressed strength, appearance being  only a secondary consideration. Books were  generally bound in  half leather with cloth sides. Magazines and newspapers were generally bound with leather backs and corner and with cloth sides lettering was stamped in gold. Scarcity of leather during World War I led to the use of cloth for entire cover. 

In 1935 the  American Library Association  issued  its 'minimum specification for Class  A Library Binding' followed in 1939 by its 'Standards for reinforced  (Pre-Library Bound) New Books' issued with the Library Binding Institute. These standards have been combined and have  been revised as needed, to reflect new materials and new processes by the Library Binding Institute. 

These standards which are useful are given below:  

  1. All books shall be careful collated before being taken apart to detect any missing or damaged leaves or any peculiarities of paper or constructions that might take rebinding inadvisable. 
  2. All tears through print shall be mended with Japanese tissue or onion skin bond, and all tears in margins with bond paper of suitable weight.
  3. Books unsuited for over sewing shall be prepared and reinforced through their folded sections.
  4. Books that are to be oversewed shall be divided into uniform sections, each section not to exceed .050 inch in thickness, except flexible pulpy paper which may be thicker sections not to exceed .606 inch each.
  5. All end papers shall consist of three functional parts: apaste-down or outward end-leaf which becomes the cover lining; at least two free-leaves, and reinforcing fabric.
  6. The construction of end papers shall be such that the sewing will go through the reinforcing fabric the same as through the sections of the book.
  7. Most books having proper inner margins and suitable paper shall be sewed with thread by Oversewing method, either by machine or by hand. If sewed by machines, all sections shall be pasted. No oversewing shall exceed 3/16 inch from the back of the edge of the volume and no nearer to the head and tail than 1 /2 inch.
  8. All books shall be trimmed as slightly as possible.
  9. Edges shall be sprinkled, stained or left plain as instructed.
  10. Backs of books shall be glued with approved flexible glue, well rounded and backed, and lined with approved canton flannel extending to within 1/4 inch of head and tail of books and well onto each end paper (approximately 11/2 inches.) 
  11. Covers shall be made of heavy weighty starch-filled or pyroxylin-filled buckram or drill base pyroxylin-coated material of a quality at least equal to the standards set forth in part v of these specifications.
  12. Covers shall be made cover hard-rolled binders board, with uniform squares, in a neat manner. The thickness of the board shall be suited to the size and weight of the book.
  13. Books shall be cased in with glycol paste and pressed between metal-edged boards until thoroughly dry.
  14. Lettering shall be done after proper sizing in clear tape of a size appropriate to the book in style and position as instructed, using X.X.23 carat gold deeply impressed to insure long adhesion to the cover.
  15. All books shall be sprayed or treated with a protective material evenly and lightly applied over their lettered backs.

 

Posted Date: 11/10/2012 1:00:03 AM | Location : United States







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