Income elasticity, Managerial Economics

Income Elasticity

The functional relationship among the changes in the quantity demanded for a good or service and the change in income of those persons demanding the good or service. If the demand for good raise as a person's income rises then the good is said to be "normal." If the demand for good decreases as a person's income rises then the good is said to be "inferior."

 

 

Posted Date: 10/17/2012 3:05:01 AM | Location : United States







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