In the southern textile mills in the late nineteenth century, History

In the southern textile mills in the late nineteenth century,

a) wages were competitive with those of New England Mills
b) long hours of work disrupted family life
c) 50 percent of the workers were black
d) 25 percent of the workers were under fifteen years of age.

Posted Date: 2/26/2014 3:13:55 AM | Location : United States







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