Implicit cursors, PL-SQL Programming

Implicit Cursors

The Oracle implicitly opens a cursor to process each SQL statement not related with an explicitly declared cursor. The PL/SQL lets you refer to the most recent implicit cursor as the SQL cursor.

The OPEN, FETCH, & CLOSE statements cannot be used to control the SQL cursor.

Posted Date: 10/4/2012 3:56:00 AM | Location : United States







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