Hydride generation method, Chemistry

Hydride generation method:

The hydride generation method of sample enhances the detection limits by a factor of 10 to 100 by converting the analyte element into a volatile hydride. Some of the elements for which this method can be used are As, Sb, Sn, Se, Bi and Pb.

The matrix modifier is a commonly acceptable method used to reduce background effects in GFAAS. In that method, a reagent is added to the sample that acts by modifying the sample matrix and thereby reduces the problem of background. In some cases the modifier may modify the analyte also.

The sensitivity of electrothermal AAS is much higher as compared to the flame AAS because in the furnace a much higher concentration of atomic vapour can be maintained as compared with flames. Additionally, in this method, the dilution of the analyte by the solvent is avoided as the solvent is evaporated before the atomisation step.

Posted Date: 1/10/2013 3:04:33 AM | Location : United States







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