How much time is required to get a total charge, Physics

If 109 electrons move out of a given body to another body every second, how much time is required to get a total charge of 1C of the other body?

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Defined q= n x e

here q=6.25x10-18

and given that 109 electrons.

so the time is required is 6.25x 10-18 x10x(9)=6.25x109

=6250000000 seconds

=104166666.666666667 minutes

=1736111.1111111 hours

=72337.96296296 days

=198.186199899 years.

Posted Date: 9/19/2012 6:50:56 AM | Location : United States







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