Heuristic, Game Theory

 

A heuristic is an aid to learning, casually brought up as a rule of thumb. Formally, a heuristic may be a mechanism capable of altering its internal model of the surroundings in reaction to feedback, or payoffs received. Heuristics are usually utilized to be told when issues are too complicated to unravel explicitly. for instance, fictitious play and best reply dynamics are straightforward heuristics for learning equilibrium in games.

 

Posted Date: 7/21/2012 4:25:43 AM | Location : United States







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