Graph theory, Advanced Statistics

Why Graph theory? It is the branch of mathematics concerned with the properties of sets of points (vertices or nodes) some of which are connected by the lines known as the edges. A directed graph is one in which the direction is associated with the edges and an undirected graph is one in which no direction is involved in connections among points. A graph might be represented as an adjacency matrix. 

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