Give a strictly 2-local automaton, Theory of Computation

Let L3 = {aibcj | i, j ≥ 0}. Give a strictly 2-local automaton that recognizes L3. Use the construction of the proof to extend the automaton to one that recognizes L3. Give a path through your extended automaton corresponding to a string in L*3. and show how the argument of the proof splits it into paths through your original automaton.

Posted Date: 3/22/2013 1:04:34 AM | Location : United States







Related Discussions:- Give a strictly 2-local automaton, Assignment Help, Ask Question on Give a strictly 2-local automaton, Get Answer, Expert's Help, Give a strictly 2-local automaton Discussions

Write discussion on Give a strictly 2-local automaton
Your posts are moderated
Related Questions
De?nition Deterministic Finite State Automaton: For any state set Q and alphabet Σ, both ?nite, a ?nite state automaton (FSA) over Q and Σ is a ?ve-tuple (Q,Σ, T, q 0 , F), w

Trees and Graphs Overview: The problems for this assignment should be written up in a Mircosoft Word document. A scanned hand written file for the diagrams is also fine. Be

Give DFA''s accepting the following languages over the alphabet {0,1}: i. The set of all strings beginning with a 1 that, when interpreted as a binary integer, is a multiple of 5.

how to find whether the language is cfl or not?

Paths leading to regions B, C and E are paths which have not yet seen aa. Those leading to region B and E end in a, with those leading to E having seen ba and those leading to B no

Ask question #Minimum 100 words accepte

The SL 2 languages are speci?ed with a set of 2-factors in Σ 2 (plus some factors in {?}Σ and some factors in Σ{?} distinguishing symbols that may occur at the beginning and en

Normal forms are important because they give us a 'standard' way of rewriting and allow us to compare two apparently different grammars G1  and G2. The two grammars can be shown to

We have now de?ned classes of k-local languages for all k ≥ 2. Together, these classes form the Strictly Local Languages in general. De?nition (Strictly Local Languages) A langu