Free body diagram-friction circle-inertia force , Mechanical Engineering

Free Body Diagram: while a body or link is isolated, the forces (active and reactive) are also illustrated on it. It is called free body diagram of the body. The essential condition for this is that the body must be in equilibrium.

Friction Circle: This is a circle that drawn with hinge centre as the centre and radius equivalent to the product of radius of the pin and coefficient of friction.

Friction Axis: this is a line that is tangential to the friction circles and along which the compression or tension in the link acts.

Inertia Force: The magnitude of the inertia force is equivalent to the product of acceleration and mass & its direction is opposite to the direction of acceleration.

Posted Date: 12/11/2012 2:57:54 AM | Location : United States







Related Discussions:- Free body diagram-friction circle-inertia force , Assignment Help, Ask Question on Free body diagram-friction circle-inertia force , Get Answer, Expert's Help, Free body diagram-friction circle-inertia force Discussions

Write discussion on Free body diagram-friction circle-inertia force
Your posts are moderated
Related Questions
Determine the centroid of the area: Determine the centroid of the area OBDC Solution The trapezium area is divided in two simple areas,  (i)        A 1 = Rectangle

Reduce expressions for the hydrostatic center and force of pressure in case of an inclined plane surface submerged in a fluid.

What are the factors responsible for the development of newer tool materials. Explain several materials used for cutting tools. List four kinds of tool wear.



In mechanics, stress is a measure of the internal forces acting within a deformable body. Quantitatively, it is a measure of the average force per unit area of a surface within the

Q. Pressure and Temperature in Unfired pressure vessels? The design pressures and coincident maximum and minimum metal temperature, shall be determined by carefully considering

where expendable pattern is used?

A jet of water moving at 8 m/sec. impinges on a concave-shaped vane to deflect the jet through 120 o when stationary. If the vane is moving at 5 m/sec., determine the angle of jet

Argon Argon is approximately one and one third times as heavy as air and ten times heavier than helium. Argon, after leaving the torch nozzle, forms a blanket over the weld