Force, Physics

Force:

Force may be defined as a push or a pull upon an object.  In the English system the pound (1b) is used to express the value of a force.  For example, we say that a force of 30 lb is acting upon a hydraulic piston.

A unit of force in the metric system is the newton (N).  The newton is the force required to accelerate a mass of 1 kilogram (kg) 1 meter per second per second (m/s2).

The dyne (dyn) is also employed in the metric system as a unit of force.  One dyne is the force required to accelerate a mass of 1g 1 centimetre per second per second (cm/s2).  One newton is equal to 100,000 dynes (0.225 Ib).

 

 

Posted Date: 9/11/2012 6:30:26 AM | Location : United States







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