Find the amplitude of the simple harmonic motion, Physics

A microphone is attached to a spring that is suspended from the ceiling. Directly below on the floor is a stationary 440 Hzsource of sound. The microphone vibrates up and down in simple harmonic motion with a period of 2.0 s. The difference between the maximum and minimum sound frequencies detected by the microphone is 2.1 Hz. Ignoring any reflections of sound in the room and using 343 m/s for the speed of sound, determine the amplitude of the simple harmonic motion

Posted Date: 2/3/2014 12:06:14 AM | Location : United States







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