Find out the roots of the subsequent pure quadratic equation, Mathematics

Find out the roots of the subsequent pure quadratic equation:

Find out the roots of the subsequent pure quadratic equation.

4x2 - 100 = 0

Solution:

Using Equation 3, substitute the values of c and a & solve for x.

1626_Taking Square Root.png

x = ± √25

x =  ±5

Therefore, the roots are x = 5 and x = -5.

Posted Date: 2/9/2013 3:00:33 AM | Location : United States







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