Fibre optics, Physics

Fibre optics:

Light travels in straight lines, even though lenses and mirrors can deflect it, light still travels in a straight line between optical devices. This is fine for most purposes; cameras, binoculars, etc. wouldn't form images correctly if light didn't travel in a straight line. However, there are times when we need to look round corners, or probe inside places that are not in a straight line from our eyes. That is why "FIBRE OPTICS" have been developed.

The working of optical fibres depend on the basic principle of optics and the interaction of light with matter. From a physical standpoint, light can be seen either as "Electromagnetic Waves" or as "Photons". For optics, light should be considered as rays travelling in straight lines between optical elements, which can reflect or refract (bend) them.

Light is only a small part of the entire spectrum of electromagnetic radiation. The fundamental nature of all electromagnetic radiation is the same: it can be viewed as photons or waves travelling at the speed of light (300,000 km/s) or 180,000 miles/sec).

 

Posted Date: 9/13/2012 8:40:49 AM | Location : United States







Related Discussions:- Fibre optics, Assignment Help, Ask Question on Fibre optics, Get Answer, Expert's Help, Fibre optics Discussions

Write discussion on Fibre optics
Your posts are moderated
Related Questions
Is beats, which we study in physic similar as we consider beats of sounds like bass. bits

Two kilograms of an ideal gas with constant c p =1kJ/kgK and c v = 0.7kJ/kgK are contained in an insulated piston-cylinder device with an initial volume of 0.3m 3 and a pressure o

Working of terrestrial telescope

whatis meant by kinametic?

find the dimensions of the following i.power ii.velocity iii.force

what will happen if we will walk with the speed of light or faster than it?

derive an expression for the variation of g with altitude or depth


Copper losses: These losses occur because of ohmic resistance of the transformer windings. If I1 and I2 are primary and secondary currents correspondingly and R1and R2 are the res

The control lever is subject to a clockwise moment of P26 N.m exerted by its shaft at A and is designed to operate with a force of P27 N.  The resultant of the couple and the force