Explain the maltose and cellobiose, Biology

Explain the Maltose and Cellobiose?

Maltose consists of two a-D-glucose molecules with the alpha bond at carbon 1 of one molecule attached to the oxygen at carbon 4 of the second molecule. This is called α1 → 4 glycosidic linkage.

Cellobiose is a disaccharide consisting of two β-D-glucose molecules that have a β (1→ 4) linkage as in cellulose. Cellobiose has no taste, whereas, maltose and trehalose are about one-third as sweet as sucrose.

Posted Date: 6/17/2013 2:46:28 AM | Location : United States







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