Explain prevalence, Advanced Statistics

Prevalence: The measure of the number of people in a population who have a certain disease at a given point in time. It can be measured by two methods, as point prevalence and period prevalence, these being defined as shown below;
929_prevalence.png 
Essentially measures the total disease in a population.

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