Explain maz experiments, Advanced Statistics

MAZ experiments: The Mixture-amount experiments which include control tests for which the entire amount of the mixture is set to zero. Examples comprise drugs (some patients do not receive any of formulations being tested) fertilizers (none of fertilizer mixtures are applied to certain plots) and paints/coatings (some of the specimens are not painted/coated). 

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