Estimate prestress losses, Civil Engineering

Given:

beam deminsions:
flange width=22"
FLANGE THICKNESS=7"
WEB WIDTH=7"
SECTION HEIGHT=40"

f'c=5000psi
f'ci=3500psi
fpu=270ksi
Ap=eighteen 1/2" diam strands
superimposed load=.85k/ft: 40' simple span
Type I cement; moist cured
Pretensioned beam

Required:

1. Estimate prestress losses at midspan 90 days after release. (elastic shortening,creep,shrinkage,steel relaxation)

Posted Date: 2/23/2013 1:04:20 AM | Location : United States







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