Equilibrium, Game Theory


An equilibrium, (or Nash equilibrium, named when John Nash) may be a set of methods, one for every player, such that no player has incentive to unilaterally amendment her action. Players are in equilibrium if a amendment in methods by anyone of them would lead that player to earn but if she remained along with her current strategy. For games during which players randomize (mixed strategies), the expected or average payoff should be a minimum of as massive as that obtainable by the other strategy.


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