Equilibrium, Game Theory

 

An equilibrium, (or Nash equilibrium, named when John Nash) may be a set of methods, one for every player, such that no player has incentive to unilaterally amendment her action. Players are in equilibrium if a amendment in methods by anyone of them would lead that player to earn but if she remained along with her current strategy. For games during which players randomize (mixed strategies), the expected or average payoff should be a minimum of as massive as that obtainable by the other strategy.

 

Posted Date: 7/21/2012 3:54:12 AM | Location : United States







Related Discussions:- Equilibrium, Assignment Help, Ask Question on Equilibrium, Get Answer, Expert's Help, Equilibrium Discussions

Write discussion on Equilibrium
Your posts are moderated
Related Questions
A strategy defines a collection of moves or actions a player can follow in a very given game. a method should be complete, defining an action in each contingency, together with peo


Consider a game in which player 1 chooses rows, player 2 chooses columns and player 3 chooses matrices. Only Player 3''s payoffs are given below. Show that D is not a best response

Explain the financial system terms definitions. The Financial System Definitions: Wealth It is sum of Current Savings and Accumulated Savings Financial asset P

1. The publishing industry in the country of Font, where the local currency is the stet, is dominated by two companies, the Arial Book Co. and Verdana Works Ltd.. Currently, both o

1.a.out 2 1 Here is the grid that has been generated: 1 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 0 1 0 0 1 1 1 1 0 0 1 1 1 1 0 1 1 0 0 1 1 0 0 1 0 1 1 1 1 1 1 0 1 0 1 1 0 1 0 1 1 1 0

What terms are included in the monopolistic competition? Product Differentiation: 1. The meaning of monopolistic competition and product differentiation 2. Why monopolist

consider the three player game in question 2 in assignment 1. Assume now that player 3 moves first. Players 1 and 2

An auction during which many (more than one) things are offered for sale. Mechanisms for allocating multiple units embody discriminatory and uniform worth auctions.

Eighteenth century Dutch mathematician codified the notion of expected utility as a revolutionary approach to risk. He noted that folks don't maximize expected returns however expe