Energy levels of this molecule, Physics

The microwave (rotational) spectrum of 12C16O having  a series of lines spaced by 115.3 GHz. Suppose that the rotational  energy levels of this molecule can be approximated by those of the rigid rotor, use these data to explain a value for the rotational constant B, the moment of inertia I, and thus the bond length R. Be careful to work in SI units throughout. (12C = 12.000 mass units and 16O = 15.995 mass units).

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