Electric current, Electrical Engineering

 

Electric current

 

  • Electric current is a flow of electrons. Each electron carries a very small amount of negative charge (1.6 x 10-19 coulombs)

 

  • A current of 1 amp at a point in a circuit is the flow of 1 coulomb of charge per second flowing past that point. This means that approx 6 x 1018 electrons must pass the point every second. This is a huge number.

 

  • Electrons circulate continuously round a circuit being pumped round by a power source.

 

  • If more than one route round the circuit is available then the electron flow will divide (in some ratio) between the available routes.

 

  • Electrons will not be lost - all those that emerge from the power source will eventually return to it.

 

  • To pump the current through any resistors in the circuit requires a voltage to be developed across them (think of it as a pressure difference required to push a fluid through a restriction)

 

Posted Date: 8/20/2012 11:42:01 PM | Location : United States







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