Eddington limit, Physics

Eddington limit (Sir A. Eddington)

The theoretical limit on which the photon pressure would go above the gravitational attraction of light-emitting body. i.e., a body emitting radiation at greater than the Eddington restrictions would break up through its own photon pressure.

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