Easier to pull a lawn roller than to push it, Physics

Explain why easier to pull a lawn roller than to push it?

Explaination

In Pulling,

effective weight of lawn mover= mg-fsinx

In pushing,

effective weight = mg+fsinx

The force applied to move a body depends upon effective weight. As effective weightin the case of pulling is less than in the pushing , so less force is required in pulling.  Hence, it is easier to pull than to push.

Posted Date: 9/19/2012 6:59:42 AM | Location : United States







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