Differences members and creditors voluntary wind up, Business Law and Ethics

Differences members and creditors voluntary wind up:

main differences between a members' and a creditors' voluntary winding up are that:

(a) in a creditors' voluntary winding up the liquidator, although responsible to members as well as creditors, is selected by the creditors.  In a members' voluntary winding up he is appointed by the members;

(b) in a creditors' voluntary winding up the liquidator must obtain the approval (usually) of the committee of inspection for the exercise of certain statutory powers.  In a members' voluntary winding up he obtains approval from the members in general meeting;

(c) there is a committee of inspection in a creditors' voluntary winding up with up to five members, a majority of whom being appointed by the creditors: s.288(1).  There is no committee in a members' voluntary winding up.

The effect is that the creditors have a decisive influence on the conduct of the liquidation.  This is reasonable since it is assumed (in the absence of a statutory declaration of solvency) that the company is unable to pay its debts in full.  The remaining assets will therefore be realized for the benefit of the creditors and the members get nothing (unless the company proves to be solvent after all).

Meetings are held in the same sequence as in a members' voluntary winding up but the meetings of creditors are called at the same intervals as the meetings of members and for similar purposes.

Posted Date: 1/15/2013 5:06:19 AM | Location : United States







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