Difference between a static budget and a flexible budget, Managerial Economics

1.  What is the difference between a static (master) budget and a flexible budget?

Ans:  static budget is where a budget doesn't change a volume changes.  An example could be that if the budget started out at $300,000, yet sales were $500,000, the budget would remain at $300,000.  A flexible budget would adjust for changes in activity and volume either via an increase or decrease in price.

Posted Date: 4/1/2013 2:52:58 AM | Location : United States







Related Discussions:- Difference between a static budget and a flexible budget, Assignment Help, Ask Question on Difference between a static budget and a flexible budget, Get Answer, Expert's Help, Difference between a static budget and a flexible budget Discussions

Write discussion on Difference between a static budget and a flexible budget
Your posts are moderated
Related Questions
Q. Central characteristics of Simon satisfying behaviour model? The pattern of policy commitments which result from the bargaining process can be seen to be a specification of

question 1, Managerial Economics

THE KEYNESIAN THEORY OF CONSUMPTION FUNCTION The theory was developed during the Great Depression which plagued Europe and America.  During this time, there was excess capacit

price output determination under monopoly explain

In regards to air pollution, use a diagram to show and explain how the existence of pollution can make the market equilibrium inefficient.

the table shows gasoline rates in US

I have a research paper that is due, my schedule is so full that I need assistance due to overload are you interested in the research paper? course - managerial economics TEXT: Man

CHARACTERISTICS OF THE THREE STAGES   Stage I Here the Total Physical Product, Average Physical Product and Marginal Physical Product are all increasing.  However MPP

Features of Free Market System The features of a free market system are: (i)         Ownership of Means of Production Individuals are free to own the means of producti

A hypothetical AD-AS model for Canada During the 1990s, many stock market investors in Canada became optimistic about information technology and bid up stock prices, more t