Development of ovule, Biology

Development of Ovule

The ovule develops from a specialised region of the ovary - the placenta. Initially it appears as a small mound on the placenta, and is composed of homogenous tissue. Subsequently it cuts off initials for the integuments, and undergoes specific degree of curvature to develop as a mature ovule. We shall resume discussion on the structural and developmental aspect of ovule later when you study integuments.

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Figure: Different stages in the development of Ovule

Posted Date: 1/23/2013 1:03:37 AM | Location : United States







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