Cutbacks and emulsions, Civil Engineering

Cutbacks And Emulsions:


A cutback is a bitumen whose viscosity has been reduced by adding a diluent such as naphtha or kerosene. The use of cut-back is not favoured as the diluents may find their way to water bodies and cause environmental problems.

Posted Date: 1/22/2013 3:12:23 AM | Location : United States

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