Convex hull trimming, Advanced Statistics

Convex hull trimming: A procedure which can be applied to the set of bivariate data to permit robust estimation of the Pearson's product moment correlation coef?cient. The points de?ning convex hull of the observations, are removed before the correlation coef?cient is calculated. The main attraction of this method or technique is that it eliminates the isolated outliers without disturbing the general shape of bivariate distribution.

Posted Date: 7/27/2012 1:02:08 AM | Location : United States







Related Discussions:- Convex hull trimming, Assignment Help, Ask Question on Convex hull trimming, Get Answer, Expert's Help, Convex hull trimming Discussions

Write discussion on Convex hull trimming
Your posts are moderated
Related Questions
MAZ experiments : The Mixture-amount experiments which include control tests for which the entire amount of the mixture is set to zero. Examples comprise drugs (some patients do no

A directed graph is simple if each ordered pair of vertices is the head and tail of at most one edge; one loop may be present at each vertex. For each n ≥ 1, prove or disprove the

Line-intersect sampling is a technique of unequal probability sampling for selecting the sampling units in the geographical area. A sample of lines is drawn in a study area and, w

An approach to decrease the size of very large data sets in which the data are first 'binned' and then statistics such as the mean and variance/covariance are calculated on each bi

Pie chart is an extensively used graphical technique for presenting relative frequencies related with the observed values of the categorical variable. The chart comprises of a cir

Incidental parameter problem is a problem which sometimes occurs when the number of parameters increases in the tandem with the number of observations. For instance, models for pa

A family of the probability distributions of the form given as   here θ is the parameter and a, b, c, d are the known functions. It includes the gamma distribution, normal dis

The Null Hypothesis - H0: β 1 = 0 i.e. there is homoscedasticity errors and no heteroscedasticity exists The Alternative Hypothesis - H1: β 1 ≠ 0 i.e. there is no homoscedasti

Point scoring is an easy distribution free method which can be used for the prediction of a response which is a binary variable from the observations on several explanatory variab

Assume that a population is normally distributed with a mean of 100 and a standard deviation of 15. Would it be unusual for the mean of a sample of 20 to be 115 or more?