Common dime-store cells, Physics

Common dime-store cells and batteries

The cells you see in the grocery, department, drug, and hardware stores which are popular for use in household convenience items such as flashlights and transistor radios are of the zinc-carbon variety. These gives 1.5 V and are available in sizes known as AAA (very small), AA, C, and D. You have probably seen all of these sizes hanging in the packages on the pegboard. Batteries made from these cells are generally 6 V or 9 V.

One type of cell and battery which has become available recently is the nickel cadmium rechargeable type.

 

Posted Date: 9/24/2012 2:32:20 AM | Location : United States







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