Change point problems, Advanced Statistics

Change point problems: Problems with chronologically ordered data collected over the period during which there is known to have been a change in the underlying data generation course. Interest then lies in, retrospectively, making the inferences about the time period or position in the sequence in which the change occurred. A well known example is the Lindisfarne scribes data in which a count is made of the occurrences of the certain type of pronoun ending observed in 13 chronologically order edmedievalmanu scripts thought to be the work of more than one author. A plot of data shows strong evidence of a change point in the below drawn figure. An easy example of the possible model for such a problem is as follows

2053_change point problems.png  

1645_change point problems1.png 

Interest would centre on estimating parameters in the model specifically the change point, τ 

Posted Date: 7/26/2012 6:15:57 AM | Location : United States







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