Catalogue codes, Humanities

Catalogue Codes 

When we prepare a catalogue for a library collection, we follow a set of principles and rules to prepare the entries and to arrange and file them. Sets of rules that prescribe the various types of entries, their format and contents are known as catalogue codes. 

The rules prescribed and followed for cataloguing documents in the library of the Popes (known as Papal Library) in the Vatican City of Italy is called "Bibiiotheca Apostelica Vatican". It is popularly known as Vatican Code. Rules prepared by Panizzi for cataloguing books of the British Museum (now called the British Library) and published in 1841 under the title "Rules for Compiling the Catalogues in the Department of Printed Books" are known as British Museum Code. 

Cutter's Rules for a Dictionary Catalogue, which was in its fourth edition at the time of his death in 1903, was the first complete code for a Dictionary Catalogue. The Library of Congress was publishing its LC Rules on Printed Cards from 1903 to 1930s. 

The Library Association of United Kingdom and the American Library Association in their joint efforts were publishing Rules for cataloguing from time to time, leaving scope for some minor deviations in the two countries. The Anglo-American Code (1908) is also known as Joint-Code. The American Library Association Rules (1949) abbreviated as ALA Rules, 1949; the Anglo-American Cataloguing Rules, 1967 known as AACR-1; and the present AACR-2 are the results of such joint efforts. 

Revision of AACR-l was taken up in 1974 by a joint committee of representatives of the national libraries and national library associations of Canada, United Kingdom and United States of America. They wanted to standardize and reconcile the practices of those countries. Further, they wanted a wider international base for AACR so that other countries may also follow the Code. The revised Code known now as AACR-2 was published in 1978. But major national libraries had not followed it till January 1981. Revised edition of AACR-2 was published in 1988. In our country libraries were adopting either the British or the American practices. With the advent of AACR-2 many libraries preferred switching over to that Code. Ranganathan published his Classified Catalogue Code (CCC) in 1934. The Code went through five editions during his lifetime. Some libraries in the country adopted this code for their library cataloguing practice. Hence, both AACR-2R and the CCC are discussed in this course and its units.  

Posted Date: 10/25/2012 6:03:39 AM | Location : United States

Related Discussions:- Catalogue codes, Assignment Help, Ask Question on Catalogue codes, Get Answer, Expert's Help, Catalogue codes Discussions

Write discussion on Catalogue codes
Your posts are moderated
Related Questions
I need report on Art criticism. Do you provide help in topic Art criticism. I need expert's assistance to solve my college assignment. Please suggest if it works for me.

Universal Bibliographic Control The bibliographic control of documents at the international level has always been a problem. Librarians have been concerned about this problem

How has the Monroe doctrine created and expanded an American political and economic empire?

why US failed to flush out Taliban from Afghanistan

Write short notes on caring and sharing.  Caring is the essence of moral life. Caring includes feelings, relationship, contends with  other persons and protecting others and ca

Is it right for society to impose norms in regards to sexuality?

Author Approach   Of the three approaches, author approach is most common. There are several reasons for it. The first of these is that the author's name is an easily identifia

Comprehensive Services Centralised agencies in countries such as the former USSR, France, Japan and China have been attempting comprehensive I & A services to cover all types

Drainage patterns- As per to the configuration of the channels, drainage systems can reduce into one of many categories termed as drainage patterns. Drainage patterns depend upon

Objectives   The objectives of centralised cataloguing are to: avoid duplication of work;  achieve uniform and standard cataloguing practices;  minimize the cost of